SHIPWRECK DIVING IN LAKE HURON by Dan Heary

May 27, 2015

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  10397218_796471960373321_8889136680070644957_o    There is nothing finer than diving one of the 3,000 “wrecks” that sit on the bottom of six lakes that consume 27% of all the fresh water in the world.
      Well, actually there is, it is yours truly diving more than sixty of them in The Great Lakes.  Lakes with tides, thirty foot waves, one hundred foot visibility down under , no fish and other variables.
      These six bodies bring the world timber, limestone, coal, 10628802_796472740373243_5614824008288238637_o (1)automobiles, steel and more as the large barges head south down the Mississippi to the largest port in the world….New Orleans.
      But it doesn’t matter how big, strong, or determined the vessel is for she is up against the gales of November, ice, white outs and much more during the winter period.  It takes four to five miles for an 800 foot barge to alter 180 degrees to make an attempt to avoid a possible severe problem with nature.
    10580754_796472010373316_214807875098757619_o In the “upper” Great Lakes one can drink the water, there are no fishing charters for the “Zebra” mussels have eaten the algae as the bottom is bare.  The surface water temperature was 65 on August 6th, and at 107 feet it was 38.1 degrees.
     NO dry suit, but a good 7mm and a rush of heaven close to hell.  There are 600 residents, maybe 6 stores as five divers did 11 wrecks in three days.  Well almost five divers, three found it too cold….WHAT…at 60 feet it was 50 degrees, perfect GREEN WATER and CLEAR.  None of this baby bathtub heated “island” stuff.  These are The Great Lakes, not the Keys, Aruba, Bermuda, blah blah.
   10600425_796472220373295_1691538772604945316_n  Only 3% of the certified divers do more than six dives, this writer has 1600, not bragging, just love it…especially shipwrecks that are intact and weathered by saltwater.  The wrecks in these pics are from the 1800′s from Northeast Lake Huron….enjoy, I did…:)
Dan: From 40-110 feet under
FYI- a cubic foot of H2O weighs 64 lbs.